Education

Children Matter: Proposed CA Budget Will Cut $517 Million From Early Care and Education

Children Matter: Proposed CA Budget Will Cut $517 Million From Early Care and Education

ZERO TO THREE Western Office News March 13, 2012  Babies in the California Budget Investing in California’s Babies Means Investing in the Future Eighty-five percent of the brain is developed by the age of 3 and there is solid research that access to high quality early learning experience can positively impact infants’ cognitive development. Early learning experiences provide our most vulnerable children a strong educational foundation that prepares them for elementary school while freeing their parents to work with peace of mind. While science has clearly established that learning begins at birth, the Governor’s proposed budget cuts target our most vulnerable infants, toddlers, preschoolers and families. Hearings are currently underway by the California’s Legislature on the Administration’s proposed budget. The Administration’s proposal includes a $517 million cut to early care and education, which would deny 62,000 children, including infants, toddlers and preschoolers, access to the educational foundation that is critical to their life—long success. This comes on top of more than $1 billion in funding cuts to these programs since 2008. The Administration has also proposed restructuring how these programs are provided—likely to result in more children losing access to quality early learning programs.  Click here for more details on

Read more »

Emeryville in the Post Redevelopment Agency Era

March 8, 2012
By
Emeryville in the Post Redevelopment Agency Era

The city’s Finance Advisory Committee met on Monday, Feb. 27.  Some of its business was routine, some not. First, some good news:  Revenue for the second quarter was up $1,512,843 over the same period last year, a gain of about 15%, and expenditures for the quarter were down $356,958.  That’s encouraging, and we hope these figures represent continuing positive trends, not just circumstantial or temporary budgetary adjustments. That’s about it for the good news.  On the grimmer side, consider the pending fate of the City’s Community Promotion Grant Program, which spent $94,500 last year to support artists, art organizations, art exhibits, access to local art, library programs, nutritional programs, low income legal assistance, and other worthy activities.  Between $91,000 and $92,000 of this funding came from our Redevelopment Agency.  And now that money is gone.  Should the General Fund be tapped to keep things going?  Should the list be pared?  Should a cap be put on the Grant Program and have entities compete for a slice of what’s still there? The Committee, wisely I think, deferred judgment on what to do.  We need to think carefully about our options, hear more from the community, and consider other possible sources for

Read more »

Children Matter: Join the Richmond Read-Aloud Volunteer Program

September 9, 2011
By

Are you looking for a good place to volunteer and help children develop a love for books and reading?  Our neighbor to the north offers just the thing.  For 15 years, volunteers like me have been reading to kindergarten and first and second grade students, one-on-one, in Richmond elementary schools—six of them at present count.  Teachers select the students who participate.  We readers meet with two students once a week for half-hour sessions right through the school year.  Every two weeks, the students get a gift book of their choosing, the building blocks for personal libraries. The program is simplicity itself: a caring adult reads to a young person and they talk about what’s read and what the reading suggests to them about the world.  You don’t have to be an expert to do it, just an enthusiastic book and reading person yourself.  And don’t think of it as just feel-good work—although you certainly will be doing something worth feeling good about.  It’s also great fun, and, for me, brought back memories of reading to my own daughters.  I’m glad Marilyn Nye, my one-time colleague at Cal State East Bay, who created the program, talked me into joining the cadre

Read more »

Shirley Enomoto Quits Measure J Oversight Committee

September 8, 2011
By
Shirley Enomoto Quits Measure J Oversight Committee

  Enomoto Questions Committee’s Role and Responsibility for Future Emeryville Center for Community Life (ECCL) Long-time Emeryville resident Shirley Enomoto said she had complained for months that the Measure J Citizen Oversight Committee (COC) lacked a clearly defined role and appeared to have little or no power, or respect, from the educators and city council members who  appointed it. To no avail. After getting no meaningful response to her concerns, Enomoto resigned from the Committee “with a heavy heart.” “It’s very obvious to me that the City/ Schools Committee still does not know or want to say what the role and responsibilites of the COC are,” Enomoto said in her resignation letter, which she submitted to COC Committee Chair Brian Carver. “They seem very reluctant to give any control to the COC and appear fearful that the Committee wants to “approve” expenditures rather than simply review them, which is one of the committee’s principal responsibilities.” Enomoto said that of the five meetings she attended, more focus, time and attention was given to community engagement than to expenditures. There were lots of refreshments, she said, but no meaningful action. Bottled water and pizza or sandwiches were always served, despite the meeting

Read more »

The Osher Life-Long Learning Institute

August 13, 2011
By
The Osher Life-Long Learning Institute

  I’ve been taking courses and attending lectures for seniors offered by Cal State East Bay’s OLLI (Osher Life-Long Learning Institute) for several years.  It’s been a mind expanding experience and great fun.  OLLI offers lectures (free to members), courses (usually four weeks in length and reasonably priced), and a variety of field trips. History, science, and literature are my own favorite topics, but the range of subjects offered is broad and the skills of the presenters impressive.  OLLI offers this rich trove at seven sites.  The two closest to Emeryville are the Lake Park Retirement Residence in Oakland and the Mastick Senior Center in Alameda.  The Baywood Retirement Residence in Castro Valley, the Danville Town Meeting Hall, the Reutlinger Community for Jewish Living, and Rossmoor in Walnut Creek aren’t all that far away.  The events at Cal State East Bay’s Concord Campus are a bit of a stretch for us but still inviting given the varied mix of offerings there.  If you would like to know more about OLLI, call 925-602-6776 or e-mail Kathleen Bryant, the Program Coordinator at kathleen.bryant@csueastbay.edu.  OLLI is also on line at www.scholarolli.com.  Give OLLI a try: no homework, no tests, no papers to write

Read more »

More Than 100 People Attend Vigil for Slain Emeryville Student

August 6, 2011
By

More than 100 students and faculty attended a vigil at Emeryville Secondary School Monday night for slain 16-year-old student Najon Jackson, according to Emery Unified School District Superintendent Debbra Lindo.

Jackson, who would have been a junior at the school this fall, was killed in a shooting in the 9300 block of Sunnyside Street in East Oakland at about 11:15 p.m. Saturday, according to Oakland police. They say they do not yet know the motive for the slaying.

Jackson’s family members, who also participated in the vigil, asked the news media to respect their privacy and not attend, Lindo said.

School board president Miguel Dwin said the fact that so many students attended the hastily organized vigil at a time when school is not in session shows how popular Jackson was.

“He was a cheery, bubbly kind of kid, and everyone liked him,” Dwin said.

Lindo said she did not personally know Jackson because she has only been in her new post for three weeks but said she’s been told that “he was a bright student who had a promising future ahead of him.”

Lindo said Jackson was interested in engineering, liked sports and was planning to try out for the varsity football team this fall.

She said most students knew Jackson because he had been attending Emeryville schools since kindergarten even though he lived in Oakland, as he was an inter-district transfer student.

“Our hearts go out to his family, and our students are really affected by this,” Lindo said.

She said counselors and psychologists were on hand at the school tonight to provide “social and emotional support” to students who are coping with Jackson’s death.

The school “is a place where students can gather and be with caring adults during this difficult time,” Lindo said.

Copyright 2011 by KTVU.com and Bay City News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Save Oakland Libraries – “Read-In” Monday, June 20 at Oakland City Hall

June 16, 2011
By
Save Oakland Libraries – “Read-In” Monday, June 20 at Oakland City Hall

In the face of a major budget crisis, Oakland is considering closing 14 of its 18 libraries, including Golden Gate on the Emeryville border. Other locations to be closed are Asian, Brookfield, Cesar Chavez, Eastmont, Elmhurst, Lakeview, Martin Luther King, Melrose, Montclair, Piedmont, Temescal, West Oakland, AAMLO, and the Tool Lending Library. Monday, June 20, Save Oakland Libraries is having a 14-Hour Read-In in front of City Hall (1 Frank Ogawa Plaza) before the Oakland City Council presents its budget recommendations on Tuesday, June 21. Guest readers, including some local celebrities, will read in 15-minute intervals continuously from 6 am to 8 pm. There will also be a children’s storytime and other activities to be announced.

Read more »

Children Matter: City Council, Corporate Citizens Need to Invest in Early Childhood Education

May 10, 2011
By
Children Matter: City Council, Corporate Citizens Need to Invest in Early Childhood Education

“…Recent studies suggest that one critical form of education, early childhood development…, is grossly under-funded. However, if properly funded and managed, investment in ECD yields an extraordinary return, far exceeding the return on most investments, private or public…. In the future any proposed economic development list should have early childhood development at the top.” — Arthur Rolnick and Robert Grunewald, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis How do you make a city if you exclude children and families from planning?  Many young professionals who live and work in Emeryville move to the suburbs to find homes and schools once they have families. In Santa Monica as development took place, early education facilities were included in the overall planning design.  This meant that centers for children and families were abundant and programs had beautiful facilities in which young children could thrive. American early educators travel, when they can, to see innovative programs.  The schools of Reggio Emilia and Pistoia in Italy are great early education communities.  They believe in investing in their young children.  I live in the Bay Area where some of the best minds in early childhood education also live and work.  We missed an opportunity: Emeryville is small enough

Read more »

Emeryville Public Market: Youth-Led Program Doubles Compostables

May 8, 2011
By
Emeryville Public Market: Youth-Led Program Doubles Compostables

The Emeryville Public Market’s food court serves close to 2,000 customers each day, with cuisine from around the globe, offered up by over 20 unique food retailers. Last year the Public Market’s property management company, TMG Partners, added a new item to the menu: a collection program for patrons’ food scraps and compostable dishware. A “key ingredient” of the program was hands-on help from Emeryville High School students. The efforts paid off. In 2010 alone, the Public Market collected 170 tons of compostables—double the amount of previous years. Collecting food scraps for composting wasn’t a new concept for the food vendors at the Emeryville Public Market. Back in 2006 TMG Partners had worked with the StopWaste Partnership to set up compostables collection in the kitchen and prep areas, keeping some 85 tons of discards out of the landfill each year. However, at the time they weren’t quite ready to also tackle “post-consumer” compostables—food scraps, napkins and paper cups left behind by customers. “Back then the food court was better known as Styrofoam Palace,” jokes Susan Shirk, property manager at the Public Market. “We simply couldn’t expect our patrons to separate their food scraps from non-compostable service ware, before rushing back

Read more »

Upcoming Events